configmacros

The configmacros extension provides the macros configuration option for the tex block of your MathJax configuration. This allows you to predefine custom macros for your page using javascript. For example,

window.MathJax = {
  tex: {
    macros: {
      RR: "{\\bf R}",
      bold: ["{\\bf #1}", 1]
    }
  }
};

defines a macro \RR that produces a bold “R”, while \bold{math} typesets the math using the bold font. See Defining TeX macros for more information.

This extension is already loaded in all the components that include the TeX input jax, other than input/tex-base. To load the configmacros extension explicitly (when using input/tex-base for example), add '[tex]/configmacros' to the load array of the loader block of your MathJax configuration, and add 'configmacros' to the packages array of the tex block.

window.MathJax = {
  loader: {load: ['[tex]/configmacros']},
  tex: {packages: {'[+]': ['configmacros']}}
};

configmacros Options

The configmacros extension adds a macros option to the tex block that lets you pre-define macros.

macros: {}

This lists macros to define before the TeX input processor begins. These are name: value pairs where the name gives the name of the TeX macro to be defined, and value gives the replacement text for the macro. The value can be a simple replacement string, or an array of the form [value, n], where value is the replacement text and n is the number of parameters for the macro. The array can have a third entry: either a string that is the default value to give for an optional (bracketed) parameter when the macro is used, or an array consisting of template strings that are used to separate the various parameters. The first template must precede the first parameter, the second must precede the second, and so on until the final which must end the last parameter to the macro. See the examples below.

Note that since the value is a javascript string, backslashes in the replacement text must be doubled to prevent them from acting as javascript escape characters.

For example,

macros: {
  RR: '{\\bf R}',                    // a simple string replacement
  bold: ['\\boldsymbol{#1}',1] ,     // this macro has one parameter
  ddx: ['\\frac{d#2}{d#1}', 2, 'x'], // this macro has an optional parameter that defaults to 'x'
  abc: ['(#1)', 1, [null, '\\cba']]  // equivalent to \def\abc#1\cba{(#1)}
}

would ask the TeX processor to define four new macros: \RR, which produces a bold-face “R”, and \bold{...}, which takes one parameter and sets it in the bold-face font, \ddx, which has an optional (bracketed) parameter that defaults to x, so that \ddx{y} produces \frac{dy}{dx} while \ddx[t]{y} produces \frac{dy}{dt}, and \abc that is equivalent to \def\abc#1\cba{(#1)}.